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The Most Definitive Guide to Hiking in New Brunswick

Fundy Footpath

White Pine Path

Return to Daly Point

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Gallery

Looking up at the white pine tree

Quick Facts

Difficulty easy
Trail Type linear
Distance 700 m
Estimated Time 20 minutes one way
Surface Type forested
Elevation Change 20 meters
Features old pines
Trail Markers none but easy to follow
Scenary Rating special features
Maintenance Rating well maintained
Cell Reception strong
Dog Friendly on a leash
Fees donations accepted
GPS File available on request

Map

Directions

For directions to the park go to the Daly Point Nature Reserve page.

The White Pine Path can be accessed on the left a short distance from the visitor center on the Field Trail. The other end of the White Pine Path can be accessed about mid way across the Woodland Trail.

Description

The White Pine path is an interesting way to get to the Woodland Trail or the Warbler Trail. On the way you will pass a few very large white pine trees that have been growing here for a very long time. You will also pass through a few small valleys, a bridges crossing a wet area, and a patch of large aspens.

From the Sign

The White Pine Path

The White Pine Path is the most rugged trail in the Daly Point Reserve. It is best known for its namesake, the ancient White Pine that grows near the trail. White Pine trees are well suited to poorer soils and drier sites but grow best in moist or loamy soils. Like the magnificent specimen on this path, they can live to be 450 years or more. There are also many other tree species that can be enjoyed while hiking the White Pine Path.

The Eastern White Cedar is also known as "Arbor Vitae" or "The Tree of Life". In the 16th century, French explorer Jacques Cartier learned from the North American natives how to use the tree's foliage to treat scurvy.

The Red Spruce tree provides cover, food and nesting sites for birds. It also provides bark, seeds and needles for snowshoe hares, porcupines and other small mammals.

The White Spruce is also known as the Canadian Spruce and Eastern Spruce. The white spruce is shallow rooted and can easily be blown over. The fallen trees provide homes for animals and insects.

The White Birch is sometimes called Paper Birch, Canoe Birch or Silver Birch. The North American natives traditionally used the paper-like bark from the White Birch for canoe construction.

Aspen leaves tremble and quake in even the lightest breeze producing a soothing rustle that most people identify as a sound of summer. Aspens are a favorite food for beavers, which use their branches to construct lodges and dams.

Videos

Trail Last Hiked: January 20, 2018.

Page Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2018.


External Links